Now Playing
X102.9
On Air
No Program
Now Playing
X102.9

news

200 items
Results 1 - 10 of 200 next >

Parents question man who legally brought gun into trampoline park

A Georgia man who legally took his handgun into a popular trampoline was not breaking the law, but some parents are questioning the man’s decision.

>> Read more trending news

Police were called to a Skyzone indoor trampoline park in Roswell on Sunday afternoon.

The general manager reported that a man brought a gun inside and proceeded to jump on the trampolines with the gun in his holster.

The manager said police were called because the man refused to store his weapon in his car.

The man, who is not being identified, said he keeps his gun on him at all times to protect his children.

“I guess the guy felt that since there wasn’t a sign up, that he could carry his gun in there,” resident Vincent Freeman said.

The father said he has a concealed carry permit and the business did not have a “no weapons” sign posted.

Roswell police said it’s up to individual businesses to post if they don’t want guns inside.

They said the man was not breaking any laws.

“The way the laws are now, I don’t suppose he was. I don’t think it was a wise decision on his part,” resident Georgia Kraff said.

Some customers said just because you can bring a gun doesn’t mean you should.

“I think there is no reason to have a gun in a place where there’s kids, and definitely no reason to have a gun while you’re jumping,” parent Judith Forgoston said.

The manager said this is a rare occasion and he does not plan on posting signs prohibiting guns.

Florida man buys pancakes, eats them in city crosswalk

A Florida man who went to an IHOP restaurant on Tuesday and ordered pancakes decided to enjoy his meal in the crosswalk of a busy street, the Lakeland Ledger reported. While the action drew plenty of laughter from witnesses, police in the Florida city located between Tampa and Orlando were not amused.

>> Read more trending news

Kiaron Thomas, 21, of Lakeland, was charged with placing an obstruction in the roadway and disrupting free flow of traffic, according to a Lakeland Police Department news release. He is due in court on April 25 to answer his charges.

Lakeland police originally responded to a call at 10:50 a.m. on March 21. The caller said Thomas was sitting in a chair in the crosswalk with a small TV table in front of him, eating what appeared to be pancakes, police said. Responding officers were unable to locate Thomas and determined that he had left the area prior to their arrival, according to the statement.

The chase might have ended there, but Thomas’ roadway seating arrangements led to a video that was posted on Facebook. “This man is a fool,” can be overheard at the beginning of the video as the person was laughing. As a tractor-trailer and a Jeep approach the crosswalk, Thomas begins to eat.

Vehicles on the highway drove around Thomas; the video is just under a minute long.

The Lakeland Police Department saw Thomas tagged in the video as the pancake eater. After his arrest, Thomas told investigators it was a prank and said he lives near the intersection.

TV ads prematurely thank congressmen for repealing Obamacare

Television advertisements thanking Republican representatives for repealing the Affordable Care Act on Friday has the conservative American Action Network PAC slightly red-faced.

>> Read more trending news

President Donald Trump and the Republican leadership suffered a major setback in their efforts to repeal the Affordable Care Act when Speaker Paul Ryan pulled his bill to repeal Obamacare from the House floor after support began to crumble. 

"We're going to be living with Obamacare for the foreseeable future," Ryan said, according to The Associated Press.

The American Action Network PAC bought a series of ads, broadcasting them during several basketball games, including the NCAA Tournament. According to Deadspin, which posted the videos on its website, the ads invited viewers to call their representatives to thank them for repealing Obamacare.

The ads asked viewers to thank representatives Barbara Comstock of Virginia, David Valadao of California, David Young of Iowa and Will Hurd of Texas, for “replacing the Affordable Care Act.”

Comstock’s ad aired during the Wizards-Nets NBA game. The ads for Valadao and Young aired on local CBS affiliates in Fresno and Des Moines before the network’s March Madness coverage.

All four ads have been taken off Deadspin’s website, but there is a YouTube video that shows the Comstock version. 

Florida sinkhole caused by unexpected culprits

The culprits behind a 7-foot-deep Florida sinkhole might not be what you’d expect.

>> Read more trending news

It seems beavers appear to be behind the Walton County hole that has closed a road by Alligator Lake, according to Northwest Florida Daily News

"We've always had problems with beavers where we don't have a bridge," Chance Powell, an engineer for Walton County, told the Daily News. 

Powell said he thinks beavers might have upset the water flow at the site of the collapse, the Daily News reported. 

On Thursday morning, crews were trying to fill in the hole when the asphalt began to cave.

"The water that flows under the road became too heavy on one side and caused it to fall in," Wilmer Stafford, Walton County public works manager, told the Daily News. 

A vehicle was driving near the hole when it collapsed. The car managed to make it across and the driver was taken to the hospital with minor injuries, according to the Daily News. 

Woman who tried to jump White House fence dangles by shoelaces

A woman from Washington state was arrested Tuesday night when she was found by Secret Service agents dangling by her shoelaces from the White House fence, NBC News reported.

>> Read more trending news

Marci Anderson Wahl, of Everett, Washington, pleaded not guilty and was released on a misdemeanor charge of unlawful entry Wednesday in D.C. Superior Court, according to court records.

A Secret Service official told NBC News that a woman tried to jump over the southwest corner of the White House fence at about 10:45 p.m. ET Tuesday. 

"The individual became entangled in security features affixed to the top of the fence, suspending them in the air on the inside of the fence," the official said.

Wahl is facing an April 27 status hearing, according to court records.

Florida couple overdoses, passes out with toddlers in car

Tiffany Tapper and Matthew Anderson were on their way to the home of Tapper’s parent Thursday night in South Florida with their two toddlers in the backseat when the couple passed out from drugs, police said. 

>> Read more trending news 

A passerby spotted Tapper, who was at the wheel, and Anderson unconscious in the car in Boynton Beach.

Anderson, 27, told police he passed out from taking suboxone, a drug he’s using to help wean himself off heroin and that Tapper, 25, also took the drug.

But police said when they searched the car — finding cockroaches and the children’s diapers soiled — they found a bag of white powder they identified as heroin and fentanyl, a much more potent and deadly drug, in Anderson’s wallet.

The two survived, and authorities placed the children with a grandparent, according to a police report.

Both face charges of child neglect. Tapper also faces a DUI charge, and Anderson drug possession charges.

The state Department of Children and Families is investigating the incident, a spokeswoman said.

The overdose problem is becoming a nationwide problem, and hearing about them has become a daily occurrence. And while not as common, authorities in the state and nation are reporting more adults found overdosed in cars with their children inside.

In January, a couple in Florida’s Sarasota County were found unconscious in their car at a gas station with their two children in the backseat. And in September, police in Ohio released a photo that went viral of a similar call. The photo showed two adults in the driver and passenger seats with a young boy in the back seat with his face blurred out.

Also in Ohio, a girl had to call 911 from the backseat of an SUV last Saturday in Cincinnati after her parents overdosed on heroin.

Study: Cancer partly caused by bad luck

Authors of a provocative study published Thursday say that their research shows most of the mutations that lead to cancer crop up naturally.

>> Read more trending news

People can get cancer from tobacco smoke or can inherit the trait, but Bert Vogelstein and CristianTomasetti at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center suggest that many cancers are unavoidable, NPR reported.

"We all agree that 40 percent of cancers are preventable," Vogelstein said at a news conference. "The question is, what about the other cancers that aren't known to be preventable?"

Vogelstein, who is also an investigator with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, explained how he and Tomasetti have refined that question. He said that every time a perfectly normal cell divides, it makes several mistakes when it copies its DNA. These are naturally occurring mutations, NPR reported.

 

Most of the time, those mutations are in unimportant bits of DNA. That's good luck. "But occasionally they occur in a cancer driver gene. That's bad luck," Vogelstein told NPR.

After two or three of these driver genes get mutated in the same cell, they can transform that healthy cell into a cancer cell.

In their new paper in Science, the researchers attempted to show how often those random errors are an inevitable part of cell division, how often they are caused by variables like tobacco smoke and how often they are inherited.

 

The researchers found that 66 percent of the total mutations are random, while 29 percent are due to the environment. The remaining 5 percent are due to heredity.

So, what can people do about preventing cancer? "Nothing. Right now, nothing," Vogelstein told NPR.

Indian politician banned after hitting flight attendant with slipper

An Indian politician was banned from flying on most of the country’s major airlines after admitting he used a slipper to hit an Air India steward, The Guardian reported.

>> Read more trending news

Ravindra Gaikwad, a member of India’s lower house for the Hindu nationalist Shiv Sena party, said the attendant had insulted him on the Pune to New Delhi flight.

“What did he say, that I hit him with my hand? I hit him 25 times with a slipper,” Gaikwad told ANI news agency in video footage it posted on Twitter.

He added that he “dare[d] the Delhi police to arrest me” over the attack and asked the Indian state airline for an apology.

“I am booked on a 4 p.m. flight to Pune,” he said Friday morning. “I will take that flight. How can they not let me travel when I have a booking and I am their passenger.”

But the airline said later in the day that it had canceled Gaikwad’s return flight, the Guardian reported. He had also been banned from flying on any member airlines of the Federation of Indian Airlines, the Press Trust of India reported.

The dispute appears to have been started after Gaikwad bought a business class ticket but was given an economy seat for the Thursday morning.

After first complaining to an air steward, Gaikwad got into a heated argument with the senior flight attendant, Shivkumar.

“[The steward] said ‘I will complain to [Indian prime minister Narendra] Modi’, so I hit him,” Gaikwad said. “Should I have to listen to this abuse?”

Shivkumar, 60, later said the MP had humiliated him in front of the crew. “He misbehaved with me, he even broke my glasses. I never expected this could happen ... God save our country if this is the culture and behavior of our MPs.”

Politicians from other parties condemned Gaikwad’s actions and the video was shared widely on social media.

Gaikwad took a train to Mumbai after being banned from the Indian airlines.

How a 'Bad Food' Attitude Can Backfire

Do you struggle with cravings and wish you had the will power to cut out certain foods completely? When we work toward a healthy diet, so many of us think that making a list of food culprits and calling them off-limits will help us to succeed. However, if you take a deeper look at the psychology behind this flawed method, you’ll see so many reasons why adopting a ''good food'' or ''bad food'' attitude will never work.  Restricting certain foods won't just make dieting miserable--it can also ruin your good intentions of getting healthy and losing weight. Making arbitrary rules about good and bad food isn’t the answer to lasting lifestyle change. Instead, use the tips below to build a better relationship with food, learn to master cravings, build self-control and enjoy all foods in moderation.   Stop Labeling Foods as 'Good' and 'Bad' For decades, behavior analysts have studied the effects of deprivation on people’s preferences for food, tangible items and activities. The majority of literature on this topic says that, when we’re deprived of something, we’re more likely to select that particular item from an array of choices. In a recent study conducted at the University of Toronto at Mississauga, researchers found that participants who were asked to restrict either high-carb or high-protein foods for three days reported higher cravings for the banned foods. So, if you label chocolate as evil and forbid it from your menu, you’ll be more likely to want it in any form.   The good news is that some level of satiation (satisfying your craving for a particular food) can actually help you to avoid overindulging more often than not. If you can be conscious about your eating and have just enough of your favorite chocolate bar to satisfy that craving, you’ll be much less tempted to dip into the candy jar on your co-worker’s desk or buy a sweet snack from the vending machine.   This information about deprivation seems like common sense, but you’ve probably heard from friends or fellow dieters that the first step in avoiding high-calorie foods is putting them out of your mind altogether. Not true! Researchers are realizing that suppressing thoughts about a particular food can cause an increase in consumption of that food. In a 2010 study, 116 women were split into three groups. The first group was asked to suppress thoughts about chocolate, the second group was asked to actively think about chocolate, and the third group was instructed to think about anything they wished. Afterward, each of the participants was given a chocolate bar. The women who had suppressed their thoughts about chocolate ate significantly more chocolate than the others, despite identifying themselves as more ''restrained eaters'' in general. This just goes to show that ''out of mind'' doesn’t necessarily always mean ''out of mouth.''   Dump the Idea of 'Diet Foods' Often, when people are trying to eat better, they start to categorize foods into those that are on their diet plan and those that are not. However, banning specific foods from your weight-loss plan may just make you crave them more.  According to an article published this year in the journal Appetite, a UK study of 129 women measured the cravings of those who were ''dieting'' to lose weight, ''watching'' to maintain their weight, and not dieting at all. The researchers found that, compared with non-dieters, dieters experienced stronger, more irresistible cravings for the foods they were restricting.   Noticing the difference between healthy and unhealthy options is definitely key in establishing a pattern of better eating. And, when you’re starting a weight-loss program, it does help to read food labels and menus carefully so that you can choose wisely. However, when you start to categorize specific foods such as candy, baked goods, alcohol and fried chicken as foods you can’t have, you’re setting yourself up for a backfire. The issue with labeling a food as a forbidden substance is that your thoughts immediately center on that particular item... and then you inadvertently start bargaining and rationalizing to get more of it. (How many times have you broken your ''diet rules'' to reward a trip to the gym with chocolate or a long day at work with a cocktail or two?)   There are some diet plans out there that advocate choosing a particular day of the week as your ''cheat day''--a day when you can indulge in all the foods you’ve cut out during the week. But listing certain foods as ''cheats'' or ''treats'' can set up a scenario where you’re depriving yourself all week long and constantly looking to the future, waiting on the moment that you’ll be showered with your favorite forbidden goodies (like those commercials where fruit-flavored candies fall from a rainbow).   Besides causing you to crave, labeling certain foods as ''forbidden'' makes it really difficult to be mindful of and content with the healthy food you’re eating most of the time. Instead of worrying about restricting foods, try to redirect your focus on creating the most delicious salad, grilling a succulent chicken breast or munching a juicy piece of fruit. If you turn your attention to the abundance of healthy options in front of you instead of weighing the pros and cons of particular foods, you’ll be more likely to really relish and rejoice in your everyday choices.   Make Sense of 'Moderation' You’ve heard the line a thousand times: Everything in moderation. But what does this phrase really mean and how can you apply it to your healthy eating plan? Usually, people hand this advice out when they’re indulging in unhealthy food and drink and trying to get you to join in, say at a wedding or birthday party. So is it just peer pressure? Or is there something to this age-old saying?   Choosing to eat all foods in moderation works just fine for some people. If you have a healthy relationship with food (e.g., you have no trouble putting away the bag of chips after just one serving), then eating a little bit of your favorite food may satisfy your craving and leave you full until the next healthy meal.   However, for some people, it just doesn’t work that way. Sweets, salts and alcohol all cause biological reactions in the body that are hard to ignore. And, if you’re someone who responds strongly to these reactions, even one small bite can trigger you to continue sampling similar goodies. If you’re one of these folks, you’re definitely not alone, and it is important to know which foods affect you in these ways. Perhaps you’re a person who can have a bite of a sundae and pass the rest on to your spouse, but a fun-size candy bar can unravel your motivation and spark unhealthy choices for the rest of the day. Noting which tempting foods are your triggers can help you arrange your environment so that you don’t overindulge.   Rearranging your environment for success is the easiest way to change your behavior. If you do decide to indulge in a ''trigger food'' in moderation, opt to eat it in a place where there aren't any other snack options for you to munch on afterwards (a food-filled party would not be the best environment!). Choose snacks that you like, but don't love, so you're not tempted to eat too much but are still satisfied. Understanding which foods are likely to lead you down a slippery slope and preparing your environment and schedule for success will help you keep cravings at bay and keep your overeating under control.   Keep Cravings in Check Cravings are a good thing. On a basic, biological level, cravings tell us when we’re hungry, thirsty, sleepy and even when we need some human attention. The problem is that, because we’re so accustomed to having easy access to eat whenever we want and we’re able to choose from many unhealthy foods, the ratio of our wants and needs are all out of whack! It is time to step back and become aware of what we’re really craving and why. When we can look objectively at our yearnings for soda, chips, cake and cookies, we can make much better decisions about what we put in our mouths.   One of the best ways to get back in touch with your true cravings is to keep track of them.  For a few days, keep a journal of the time of day, what you’re craving, and whether you’re at work, at home, on the road, with your kids, etc. You can still give in to temptation—this exercise will simply give you a clearer picture of how often you crave, what you crave and in what settings those cravings occur.   In behavior science, before we try to change any habit, we do an assessment like this to look at the person’s current patterns so that we can set goals for small, stepwise changes. You’ll likely notice a pattern quickly (e.g., I always want something sweet with my 10 a.m. coffee). Then you can put some measures in place to deter this craving or make a healthy choice before it happens (e.g., I’ll start bringing a piece of fruit to eat with coffee so I don’t grab a muffin from the break room).   With a little mindfulness, you can ditch the ''good food, bad food'' attitude! Plan carefully and stay in tune with your body to make sensible decisions that will satisfy your cravings and promote weight loss.        References:   James A.K. Erskine & George J. Georgiou. 4 February 2010. Effects of thought suppression on eating behaviour in restrained and non-restrained eaters. Appetite 54, 3 (2010):499-503.   Jennifer S. Coelho, Janet Polivy, C. Peter Herman. 16 May 2006. Selective carbohydrate or protein restriction: Effects on subsequent food intake and cravings. Appetite 47, 3 (November 2006): 352-360.   David B. McAdam, Kevin P. Klatt, Mikhail Koffarnus, Anthony Dicesare, Katherine Solberg, Cassie Welch, & Sean Murphy. The effects of establishing operations on preferences for tangible items. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis 38 (2005): 107-110.   Anna Massey & Andrew J. Hill. 18 January 2012. Dieting and food craving. A descriptive, quasi-prospective study. Appetite 58, 3 (June 2012): 781–785. Article Source: http://www.sparkpeople.com/resource/nutrition_articles.asp?id=1770

Break Out of Your Food Rut!

What's for dinner? What are you eating for breakfast or lunch tomorrow? If you aren't feeling excited about your meals, or if your kids are complaining about eating chicken again, you may be in a food rut.   It happens easily; between work obligations, social plans, and kids' soccer practices, we tend to fall back on easy-to-prepare staple meals that don’t require much thought or effort. And for some of us, cooking doesn’t come easily or isn’t a pleasure, so we rely on a handful of recipes we can confidently prepare.   While it's wonderful to have a few go-to meals you can rely on in a pinch, it can get old when you rely on the same meals too often. And that lack of excitement about what's on your plate could lead you to reach for additional snacks or sweets to bring more pleasure back to your eating—which can be a problem if you're trying to manage your weight or eat healthier.   We recently asked SparkPeople members if they were stuck in a diet rut, and we were surprised by how many people replied. Member CHOUBROU summed it up this way: ''The food rut is my biggest problem! I fall into it because eating the same go-to meals is convenient and easy. But eventually I get tired of eating the same thing, and that leads me to the temptation of eating out more, eating more frozen/processed meals, etc.''   SparkPeople member KALENSMOMMY5 asked for help: ''One of the main reasons I fall off the healthy eating wagon is that I get caught in a major food rut! As I am a full-time working single mom to a toddler, I have very limited time to cook, so I end up buying the same grab-and-go foods week after week. The unhealthy choices start to look more and more attractive as I get more bored with my standard foods. Help would be much appreciated!''   Lots of folks told us they’ve hit the wall, cooking-wise. What’s more, they shared great advice on how you can break boring food habits, no matter what causes them.   5 Signs You're Stuck in a Food Rut (and What to Do about It)   Sign #1: You Don’t Enjoy Cooking For many folks, getting dinner on the table is a chore, not a pleasure. If you don’t love to cook, or you’re not confident in your culinary skills, then it's normal to feel like you're in a food rut for awhile—at least until you develop a few basic meals that you can prepare quickly and easily. Here’s how:

  • First, think about what you enjoy eating. Sandwiches? Burritos? Breakfast for dinner? Salads? Consider how you can make those into healthy dinner options.  
  • Settle on three to five things you like, and find simple recipes for those meals. SparkRecipes is a great resource for quick and healthy meal ideas.  
  • Get comfortable with the basics. Once you’ve mastered an essential technique like sautéing boneless chicken breasts, then you can move on to experiment with different sauces or add-ins to change things up over time and prevent yourself from getting bored.  
  • Accept that you don’t love to cook, but don’t let that be your excuse for not eating healthy. If you master a few basic recipes, you’ll gain confidence—and you’ll be making a commitment to yourself.
Sign #2: You’re On Auto-Pilot Even accomplished home cooks tend to get stuck in a rut preparing the same go-to dinners over and over. Katie, a mother of two, posted: ''[My son] calls me on my food ruts—I know I've got problems when my garbage disposal of a kid complains about what I'm cooking.''   Like many folks who commented on our question about food habits, Katie says she refers to cooking magazines (her favorite is Food and Wine) for inspiration when she’s stuck in a routine. Cooking Light magazine and the books ''Cook This, Not That'' by David Zinczenko and Matt Goulding, and ''Fast Food My Way'' by Chef Jacques Pepin were also recommended as great resources for quick and healthy meals.   David posted about different ways to find culinary inspiration: ''I realize [I’m in a food rut] when I’m on auto-pilot preparing a meal that usually gives me joy to cook. I break it up by shopping somewhere new for groceries, or getting a new cooking gadget, or sharpening my knives or getting a new spice.''   A simple strategy for busting out of the auto-pilot cooking rut is to find alternate ways to prepare those go-to meals—in particular, look to different ethnic cuisines for interesting takes on your standards. If spaghetti with meat sauce is in your repertoire, try linguine with spicy shrimp sauce instead. Not feeling that leftover chicken? Turn it into something new, like a tostada. Sometimes simply swapping a few ingredients within a go-to recipe can give you a whole new flavor and make your meals interesting again. Same with sides: If you're always steaming broccoli or brown rice, experiment with other healthy veggies or whole grains such as whole-wheat couscous, millet or quinoa instead.   Sign #3: You Always Eat the Same Meals This food rut often shows up at the start of the day, when we’re so busy getting out the door that we neglect a healthy breakfast, or we choose convenience foods over healthy ones. SparkPeople member LINDSAYHENNIGAN commented that she found herself eating high-fiber breakfast cereal every day: ''I got too focused on how much fiber they added, and failed to notice the 40 grams of sugar I was consuming each morning. My trainer caught it, and switched me over to bread with 2 or less grams of sugar with peanut butter, and I feel so much better.''   SparkPeople member FLUTTEROFSTARS, a vegetarian, shared a bunch of great ideas she enjoys to start her day: ''I’m fighting to get out of my food rut! I’ve been 'Sparking' for two months now, and have come up with several winning mini-meals.'' Some of her favorites include:
  • Salad with Morningstar veggie crumbles and low-fat cheddar cheese
  • Omelets with frozen vegetable blend
  • Greek yogurt with strawberries and flaxseed
  • The ''one-minute microwave muffin'' recipes for breakfast sandwiches from SparkRecipes
We all go through busy periods in our lives—a hectic few weeks at work, an extra-busy sports season—and getting a healthy dinner on the table every evening is even more challenging. Creating a weekly meal plan and then shopping for all the ingredients you’ll need helps avoid the food rut. When you know in the morning what you’re making for dinner that night, you can avoid grabbing quick and not-so-healthy items on that emergency trip to the grocery.  And planning dinners that can be repurposed into lunches avoids brown-bag boredom.   Sign #4: You’re Bored with Brown Bagging We’ll congratulate you for committing to bringing a healthy lunch instead of heading to the nearest fast food joint. But the contents of your brown bag need an overhaul if you’re stuck in the PB&J or turkey sandwich routine day in and day out.   Turning dinner into lunch is a great way to vary your midday meal, especially if you plan ahead and prepare extra food in the evening for the next day’s (or week’s) lunchbox. A dinner of grilled steak and veggies can become a lunchtime salad, and a pasta supper easily transforms into a chilled pasta salad a day later.   SparkPeople member FELIFISH26 posted: ''I usually eat the same boring thing for lunch (half a turkey sandwich on sandwich thin bread, cottage cheese, low-fat chips). BLAH, right?! After awhile your taste buds start to get used to it all, and I could probably be eating cardboard and not know the difference!'' She solved her lunch dilemma by combining some cooked chicken from dinner the night before with fresh pico de gallo that she made with chopped tomato, onion and cilantro. New lunch idea: chicken tacos.   Sign #5: You’re Stuck on ''Diet-Safe'' Foods Several SparkPeople members commented that their commitment to weight loss means they have a limited number of meal options that meet their calorie limits. Member STACYD16 wrote, ''I do believe that I'm in a food rut. I eat the same things daily because I know their caloric contents. I do have a cheat day about once a week that I really enjoy—and I thought that would throw me off, but it has really helped. I realized my issue is more portion control vs. the actual foods that I eat.''   While eating within a calorie range can be a challenge, portion control can help. You can also search for specific recipes within a certain calorie range by using the Advanced Search on SparkRecipes.com. So if you want slow-cooker dinners that contain fewer than 400 calories, simply edit your search options and voila! You'll be surprised just how many delicious and easy meals you can find within your calorie range for any meal.   When All Else Fails: Embrace the Rut Here’s one final strategy for breaking out of your food rut—know that you’ll get into one. Steve posted about exactly that: ''Another thing I'll do is the mid-week ‘king's food’ omelet—where, no matter what, I'll cook an omelet using the leftovers of previous meals. This does two things: It creates interesting flavors with combos I’d normally never think of, and it motivates me to cook good stuff early in the week because it's potential omelet fodder.''   Just as you can't expect perfection when it comes to eating within your calorie range, losing two pounds per week, or exercising as much as you'd like, you can't expect to be perfect in the kitchen, either—or to love every bite you eat. Accept that we all go through ruts with our food. But instead of allowing it to throw you off track, use it as a sign to change things up and find creative ways to make your food fun and delicious again. And remember, this (food rut) too, shall pass!   Article Source: http://www.sparkpeople.com/resource/nutrition_articles.asp?id=1759

200 items
Results 1 - 10 of 200 next >