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Deadly Manchester blast after Ariana Grande concert: 5 things to know

A deadly blast after an Ariana Grande concert Monday night at England's Manchester Arena has killed at least 22 people and injured 59 others, police said.

Here's what we know so far: 

>> Police: At least 22 dead after explosion near Ariana Grande concert in Manchester

1. The explosion happened after Grande had left the stage and concertgoers were leaving. Witnesses reported hearing the explosion near the exit about 10:30 p.m. local time, The Associated Press reported.

“A huge bomb-like bang went off that hugely panicked everyone, and we were all trying to flee the arena,” Majid Khan, 22, told the AP. “It was one bang, and essentially everyone from the other side of the arena where the bang was heard from suddenly came running towards us as they were trying to exit.”

2. Police believe that the incident was a terrorist attack conducted by a male suicide bomber. Fox News reported that the man, who died at the scene, "detonated an improvised explosive device," according to authorities. Police are investigating whether the man had any accomplices, the AP reported.

>> PHOTOS: Explosion, fatalities at Ariana Grande concert in England

3. Children were among the dead, police said. Meanwhile, families were searching for loved ones who attended the concert.

>> Manchester explosion: Here’s what we know about the victims

4. Grande said she was "broken" over the news. "From the bottom of my heart, I am so so sorry. I don't have words," tweeted the pop star, who was not hurt in the incident.

>> See the tweet here

>> Ariana Grande says she's 'broken' over deadly explosion after Manchester concert

Her manager, Scooter Braun, also issued a statement.

"Tonight, our hearts are broken. Words cannot express our sorrow for the victims and families harmed in this senseless attack," he wrote.

>> Read more trending news

"We mourn the lives of children and loved ones taken by this cowardly act. We are thankful for the selfless service tonight of Manchester's first responders who rushed towards danger to help save lives. We ask all of you to hold the victims, their families, and all those affected in your hearts and prayers."

>> See the post here

5. President Donald Trump called those behind the attack "losers."

"So many young, beautiful, innocent people living and enjoying their lives murdered by evil losers in life,” Trump said Tuesday in Bethlehem. “I won’t call (the attackers) monsters, because they would like that term. They would think that’s a great name. I will call them, from now on, losers because that’s what they are, they’re losers.”

>> Watch his remarks here

British Prime Minister Theresa May called the apparent attack “the worst ever to hit the north of England.”

“It is now beyond doubt the people of Manchester have fallen victim to a callous terrorist attack,” she said.

She added that authorities know the name of the suspected perpetrator but will not reveal his identity yet.

'Dangal' becomes China's biggest non-Hollywood foreign film

The Aamir Khan film "Dangal," about an Indian man training his daughters to become wrestlers, has become China's biggest-grossing non-Hollywood foreign movie.

The Indian film, whose name translates as "Let's Wrestle, Dad," was released in China on May 5. By Tuesday, it had pulled in 806 million yuan ($117 million) in mainland China, according to data from EntGroup, a leading entertainment consultancy.

The previous top-performing non-Hollywood foreign film was the 2016 "Your Name," a Japanese fantasy drama. It made 577 million yuan ($84 million) at the Chinese box office.

Media and online commentary has said "Dangal," which is based on a true story, impressed audiences with its message of giving girls opportunities in a male-centric society, and has prompted discussions over how strict parents should or should not be when raising their children.

Actor and producer Khan had already built up a following in China following the success of his previous films "3 Idiots" and "PK." The Bollywood star has garnered 640,000 followers on the Twitter-like Sina Weibo since opening an account in early April.

The Latest: Police say bomber died in concert attack

The Latest on the explosion at an Ariana Grande concert in Manchester, England (all times local):

8 a.m.

Manchester police say the man who set off an improvised explosive device at an Ariana Grande concert in northern England died in the attack.

Police said Tuesday 22 people died in the attack Monday night. It wasn't clear if that included the suspected suicide bomber. Dozens more were injured.

Chief Constable Ian Hopkins said forensic investigations are continuing as police try to determine if the attacker had accomplices.

He did not provide any information about the individual who detonated the device.

___

7:30 a.m.

Greater Manchester Police say 22 people died in an attack on concert-goers at an Ariana Grande performance in northern England.

Chief Constable Ian Hopkins said Tuesday the attacker used an explosive device. Police are trying to determine if the attacker acted alone or had support.

Police say some 400 officers were deployed overnight to help with the investigation.

Officials say children were among the victims of Monday's explosion.

___

7 a.m.

The explosion that struck an Ariana Grande concert attended by thousands of young music fans in northern England killed at least 19 people and injured dozens. Police said Tuesday they suspected it was a terrorist attack.

Greater Manchester Police Chief Constable Ian Hopkins says police are treating the blast as an act of terrorism "until we know otherwise." The local ambulance service says 59 people were taken to hospitals.

There was panic after the explosion, which struck around 10:30 p.m. (2130 GMT) Monday night as Grande was ending the concert, part of her Dangerous Woman Tour.

The singer, who was not injured, tweeted hours later: "Broken. From the bottom of my heart, I am so so sorry. I don't have words."

___

6 a.m.

Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn says he and Prime Minister Theresa May have agreed to suspend election campaigning until further notice.

Corbyn said Tuesday he is "horrified" by the events in Manchester and that his thoughts are with the families and friends of those who have died and been injured.

Campaign events ahead of the June 8 general election will now be put on hold as Britain comes to grips with the incident and its aftermath.

Corbyn says he had spoken with May after the explosion.

__

5:45 a.m.

Australia's prime minister has told the Australian Parliament that the deadly explosion at Manchester Arena appeared to be a "brutal attack on young people everywhere."

Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull said the British were treating the blast that killed at least 19 people and injured more than 50 as a terrorist attack, although its cause was unknown.

Turnbull says: "This incident, this attack, is especially vile, especially criminal, especially horrific because it appears to have been deliberately directed at teenagers."

In Tokyo, a spokesman for the Japanese government condemned the attack.

___

4 a.m.

Campaigning has been suspended in Britain's national election after a deadly explosion at Manchester Arena.

Prime Minister Theresa May canceled campaign events Tuesday after the blast, which killed at least 19 people and injured more than 50. She is due to chair a meeting of the government's emergency committee, COBRA, later.

Liberal Democrat leader Tim Farron cancelled a campaign tour to Gibraltar after the explosion, which police say they are treating as a terrorist attack.

Britons are due to go to the polls on June 8.

___

3:45 a.m.

A number of Manchester taxi services say they are offering free rides to people trapped by the incident.

The taxi companies posted messages about the free rides on Twitter after an explosion at Manchester Arena after an Ariana Grande concert Monday night. The blast killed 19 people and injured dozens more.

The service could also be used by people trying to get to local hospitals to look for loved ones.

In addition some city residents opened their homes to provide overnight lodging for people who were stranded by the shutdown in some train services because of the incident.

City officials said the true spirit of Manchester was surfacing in the hours after the incident.

___

3:35 a.m.

The Department of Homeland Security says there is no evidence of credible threats against music venues in the U.S., as England reels from an explosion at an Ariana Grande concert late Monday.

The department says the U.S. public may experience increased security in and around public places and events.

DHS says it is closely monitoring the situation at Manchester Arena and working with U.K. officials to obtain additional information about the cause of the explosion.

The government is urging U.S. citizens in Manchester to heed directions from local authorities and be vigilant about their security.

The explosion killed at least 19 people and injured dozens. Police say they are treating as a terrorist attack.

___

3:20 a.m.

Frantic loved ones of young people missing after an explosion at an Ariana Grande concert have taken to Twitter and Instagram with their photos and pleas for help.

Many Manchester residents responded early Tuesday with offers of shelter and details on locations where displaced concert-goers had been taken in.

The 23-year-old Grande, true to her youthful fan base, is a social media phenomenon with 105 million followers on Instagram and 45.6 million followers on Twitter. Her fans, proud "Arianators," were among those who took to Twitter with prayers and tears.

Fellow stars offered condolences as well.

Taylor Swift tweeted, "My thoughts, prayers and tears for all those affected by the Manchester tragedy tonight. I'm sending all my love."

Ellie Goulding, Cher (fresh from a big night at the Billboard Awards) and Katy Perry were among others to tweet their support.

___

3 a.m.

Greater Manchester Police say they are working with national police and intelligence agencies in what is being treated as a terrorist incident.

Police said Tuesday morning they are still gathering information about the incident and are setting up a telephone hot line to help people locate loved ones. Police said there are 19 confirmed deaths.

Authorities are also asking the public to stay away from the area around Manchester Arena where an explosion disrupted a crowded pop concert by American artist Ariana Grande.

The British government is planning an emergency Cabinet meeting for later Monday morning.

___

2:45 a.m.

British Prime Minister Theresa May says the government is working to learn the full details of the blast that killed 19 people at an Ariana Grande concert Monday night.

May says the government is trying to establish "the full details of what is being treated by the police as an appalling terrorist attack."

She said her thoughts are with the victims and the families of those who have been affected.

The government is expected to call an emergency cabinet meeting to deal with the incident.

___

1:20 a.m.

Greater Manchester Police say 19 people have been confirmed dead in an explosion at Manchester Arena that is being treated as a possible terrorist attack.

Police said roughly 50 people were injured. Police said the incident started at 10:35 Monday night at an Ariana Grande concert.

Emergency vehicles were on the scene helping the injured and bomb disposal units were later seen outside the venue.

There was mass panic after the explosion at the end of the concert, which was part of Grande's The Dangerous Woman Tour.

___

1:05 a.m.

Bomb disposal units were seen at Manchester Arena after an explosion during an Ariana Grande concert.

They were called after reports of an explosion that police said caused fatalities.

There were few immediate details and trains into the area were suspended.

A representative of Grande's US record label says the singer is OK and they are investigating what happened.

___

11:55 p.m.

Police says there are "a number of fatalities" after reports of an explosion at an Ariana Grande concert in northern England.

Police advised the public to avoid the area around the Manchester Arena Monday night.

There were no immediate details of what happened during the concert by the American singer.

Video from inside the arena showed concertgoers screaming as they made their way out amid a sea of pink balloons.

The Latest: Police evacuate Manchester shopping center

The Latest on the blast at an Ariana Grande concert in northern England (all times local):

11:45 a.m.

Police have evacuated a large shopping center in Manchester, England. Police declined to comment on media reports that they have arrested a man there.

July McKenzie, who was shopping when the Arndale shopping center, said: "We were just in the shop and could hear people screaming and security guards telling everybody to get out."

Some people left the scene in tears, while others waited outside the mall.

The Arndale center was rebuilt after an IRA bombing in 1996.

___

11:35 a.m.

Turkish officials say they "strongly condemn" the attack in Manchester and promised to work together with the United Kingdom against terror. President Recep Tayyip Erdogan says that Turkey "shares the pain of the state of England and the English people" in the attack that killed 22 people.

Turkey has been hit by a string of attacks blamed on the Islamic State group and Kurdish militants since 2015, killing at least 550 people.

___

11:15 a.m.

British Prime Minister Theresa May says that it is "beyond doubt" that Britain and the city of Manchester have fallen victim to "a callous terrorist attack."

Speaking outside her offices in London, she says "Although it is not the first time Manchester has suffered in this way, it is the worst attack the city has experienced, and the worst ever to hit the north of England."

May says police believe they know the attacker's identity but are not disclosing it immediately.

___

11:10 a.m.

British Prime Minister Theresa May says police and security staff in Manchester believe they know identity of the apparent suicide bomber who attacked people leaving an Ariana Grande concert Monday night, but they are not revealing the name for the time being.

Speaking in London, May said: "This attack stands out for its appalling, sickening cowardice."

She says the attack, in which 22 people died, was one of the worst the nation had suffered.

___

11:00 a.m.

Harun Khan, the secretary general of the Muslim Council of Britain, has joined the condemnations of the Manchester attack.

In a statement, Khan says: "This is horrific, this is criminal. May the perpetrators face the full weight of justice both in this life and the next."

He adds: "I urge all those in the region and around the country to pool together to support those affected."

___

10:55 a.m.

Finance ministers from the 28 European Union countries, including Britain's Philip Hammond, observed a minute's silence in memory of those killed and injured in the attack at an Ariana Grande concert in Manchester.

Ahead of the regular EU meeting of finance ministers, Hammond expressed his condolences to the victims and their families of "this barbaric attack" in Manchester.

"It is, as far as we know, a terrorist incident," he said. "We are treating it as such."

Hammond, who was due to speak at a panel in Brussels, is to return to London at the meeting's conclusion instead.

Flags are also flying at half-staff outside the European Commission in the heart of the Belgian capital.

___

10:40 a.m.

France's interior minister says the government will be issuing instructions Tuesday to regional administrators on working with event organizers on how to secure public spaces.

After a high-level security meeting in Paris Tuesday, Interior Minister Gerard Collomb said organizers of sports events, concerts and other performances already had a series of instructions on how to secure their venues. Collomb said France's airports have also been secured.

France has been on heightened alert since the Nov. 13, 2015, attacks that struck a concert, the national stadium and cafes and bars.

Early Tuesday, the Paris mayor's office said all shows and concerts scheduled in coming days are going ahead as planned. Ariana Grande is scheduled to perform in Paris on June 7.

___

10:30 a.m.

President Vladimir Putin says Russia is ready to boost anti-terror cooperation with Britain in the wake of a deadly explosion at an Ariana Grande concert in Manchester, England.

In Tuesday's telegram to British Prime Minister Theresa May, Putin offered condolences over what he called a "cynical, inhuman crime" and wishes for a quick recovery of all those hurt.

Putin reaffirmed Russia's readiness to "expand anti-terror cooperation with British partners, both on bilateral level and within the framework of broad international efforts."

Britain and other NATO allies have cut cooperation with Moscow on fighting terrorism over Russia's annexation of Ukraine's Crimean Peninsula and support for a pro-Russia insurgency in eastern Ukraine.

Manchester police say an apparent suicide bomber set off an explosive device at the end of the concert, killing 22 people.

___

10:15 a.m.

Former Manchester United soccer star David Beckham posted on Facebook: "As a father & a human what has happened truly saddens me. My thoughts are with all of those that have been affected by this tragedy."

In targeting Manchester, the attacker struck at one of Britain's cultural hearts. The once gritty industrial city, with London and Liverpool, has been one of the main cultural influences on modern Britain, with its iconic Manchester United football team, its cross-city rival City and chart-toppers Oasis, The Smiths and other globally famous bands. Oasis singer Liam Gallagher tweeted that he is "in total shock and absolutely devastated."

Peter Hook of Manchester bands New Order and Joy Division tweeted that his daughter "made it home safe" from the Ariana Grande concert and added: My heart goes out to all parents & those involved. Manchester stay strong."

___

10:05 a.m.

Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas has denounced the "ugly terrorist attack" in Manchester, speaking after a West Bank meeting with President Donald Trump. Abbas says he is sending his condolences to the British prime minister, the British people and the families of the victims.

Both Trump and the Palestinian leader opened their remarks with a condemnation of the attack in which 22 people were killed by a bomb blast during a concert in the city in northern England.

___

9:15 a.m.

President Donald Trump is expressing solidarity with the United Kingdom in the wake of a deadly explosion at an Ariana Grande concert in Manchester, England, condemning the "evil losers" behind the blast.

Trump spoke Tuesday after a meeting in Bethlehem with Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas (mahk-MOOD' ah-BAHS').

Manchester police say an apparent suicide bomber set off an improvised explosive device at the end of the concert, killing 22 people.

Trump says the attack preyed on "innocent children." He says this "wicked ideology must be obliterated. And I mean completely obliterated."

Manchester police so far have said nothing about the attacker's identity or possible motivation.

___

9:00 a.m.

Social media users are helping the desperate hunt for people missing in the Manchester concert bombing by circulating names and photos with the MissingInManchester hashtag.

The city's regional government and its mayor, Andy Burnham, were among scores of Twitter users that circulated the hashtag to help people seeking missing family members and friends.

Those named as missing included Olivia Campbell. Her mother, Charlotte Campbell, said the 15-year-old attended the Ariana Grande concert with a friend from school who has since been found and is being treated in a hospital. But Olivia is missing, having last called home just before the concert, the mother told ITV television's Good Morning Britain breakfast show.

She says: "I've called the hospitals. I've called all the places, the hotels where people said that children have been taken and I've called the police. If anyone sees Olivia, lend her your phone, she knows my number."

___

8:45 a.m.

A Czech woman who was at the Ariana Grande concert in Manchester says that "there was almost no security check, rather zero. They let us get in without any check if we have anything with us."

Nikola Trochtova told the Czech public radio that "the only thing they were interested in was if we had any bottles of water with us. They almost didn't check our bags, they didn't take a look."

She says she was leaving the venue when she heard an explosion at the entrance, but learned the details only after returning to her hotel.

___

8:35 a.m.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel says it's "incomprehensible" that someone would target a pop concert to kill and wound people.

Merkel said in a statement Tuesday that the attack at an Ariana Grande concert in Manchester "will only strengthen our determination to keep acting together with our British friends against those who plan and carry out such inhuman deeds."

She added: "I assure people in Britain that Germany stands beside you."

___

8:20 a.m.

European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker says Europe is mourning with Britain after a bomb killed 22 people at a concert in Manchester.

Juncker said in a statement Tuesday that "today we mourn with you. Tomorrow we will work side by side with you to fight back against those who seek to destroy our way of life."

He adds: "It breaks my heart to think that, once again, terrorism has sought to instill fear where there should be joy, to sow division where young people and families should be coming together in celebration."

___

8:10 a.m.

NATO's chief is expressing solidarity with Britain after a bomb attack in Manchester killed 22 people, just as leaders of the military alliance prepare to meet to discuss counter-terrorism.

Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg said in a tweet Tuesday that "NATO stands with the U.K. in the fight against terrorism." He also said his thoughts were with all those affect by the "barbaric" attack.

President Donald Trump and other NATO leaders at to gather in Brussels on Thursday to discuss ways the military alliance can do more against terrorism.

___

8:00 a.m.

The German government is offering condolences to Britain after the deadly explosion at an Ariana Grande concert in Manchester.

Foreign Minister Sigmar Gabriel wrote Tuesday on Twitter: "Terrible news from Manchester! Our thoughts are now with our British friends. United we stand."

Chancellor Angela Merkel's spokesman, Steffen Seibert, tweeted: "Our thoughts (and) prayers are with the people in #Manchester affected by the blast. We mourn for the dead (and) hope the injured can recover fully."

___

7:45 a.m.

France's government is offering sympathy and solidarity following the bombing at an Ariana Grande concert in Manchester which killed 22 people.

In a statement, French President Emmanuel Macron said France would continue to work with Britain to fight terrorism. Macron said he would speak with British Prime Minister Theresa May to stay abreast of developments.

Paris Mayor Anne Hidalgo also expressed solidarity.

Paris has grim experience with the type of attack that struck Britain, after multiple Islamic State attackers struck a concert hall, the national stadium and cafes and bars on Nov. 13, 2015, killing 130 people.

___

7:30 a.m.

The White House says President Donald Trump is being provided updates on the Manchester concert explosion by his national security team.

Trump is in the midst of his first overseas trip as president. He's meeting Tuesday in Bethlehem with Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas and speaking at Yad Vashem, the Holocaust memorial in Jerusalem.

His spokesman Sean Spicer provided the update on Twitter.

___

7:20 a.m.

Manchester police say an apparent suicide bomber set off an improvised explosive device at the end of an Ariana Grande concert.

Police raised the death toll to 22 early Tuesday, and dozens more have been reported injured.

Chief Constable Ian Hopkins says forensic investigations are continuing to determine if the attacker had accomplices. He provided no information about the individual who detonated the device.

___

7:10 a.m.

Greater Manchester Police have raised the death toll in a blast at an Ariana Grande concert to 22.

The force's chief constable, Ian Hopkins, said Tuesday they believe one person carried out the attack. Police are trying to determine if the person acted alone or had support in the Monday night blast.

Police say some 400 officers were deployed overnight to help with the investigation.

Officials say children are among the victims.

___

7 a.m.

Police say they are treating an explosion at an Ariana Grande concert in northern England as terrorism. Greater Manchester Police says the blast killed at least 19 people, and the ambulance service says 59 people have been taken to hospitals.

Greater Manchester Police Chief Constable Ian Hopkins says police are treating the blast as an act of terrorism "until we know otherwise."

There was panic after the explosion, which struck around 10:30 p.m. (2130 GMT) Monday night as Grande was ending the concert.

Grande, who was not injured, tweeted hours later: "Broken. From the bottom of my heart, I am so so sorry. I don't have words."

___

6 a.m.

Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn says he and Prime Minister Theresa May have agreed to suspend election campaigning until further notice.

Corbyn said Tuesday he is "horrified" by the events in Manchester and that his thoughts are with the families and friends of those who have died and been injured.

Campaign events ahead of the June 8 general election will now be put on hold as Britain comes to grips with the incident and its aftermath.

Corbyn says he had spoken with May after the explosion.

__

5:45 a.m.

Australia's prime minister has told the Australian Parliament that the deadly explosion at Manchester Arena appeared to be a "brutal attack on young people everywhere."

Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull said the British were treating the blast that killed at least 19 people and injured more than 50 as a terrorist attack, although its cause was unknown.

Turnbull says: "This incident, this attack, is especially vile, especially criminal, especially horrific because it appears to have been deliberately directed at teenagers."

In Tokyo, a spokesman for the Japanese government condemned the attack.

___

4 a.m.

Campaigning has been suspended in Britain's national election after a deadly explosion at Manchester Arena.

Prime Minister Theresa May canceled campaign events Tuesday after the blast, which killed at least 19 people and injured more than 50. She is due to chair a meeting of the government's emergency committee, COBRA, later.

Liberal Democrat leader Tim Farron canceled a campaign tour to Gibraltar after the explosion.

Britons are due to go to the polls on June 8.

___

3:45 a.m.

A number of Manchester taxi services offered free rides to people stranded by the incident.

The taxi companies posted messages about the free rides on Twitter after an explosion at Manchester Arena after an Ariana Grande concert Monday night. The blast killed 19 people and injured dozens more.

The service could also be used by people trying to get to local hospitals to look for loved ones.

In addition some city residents opened their homes to provide overnight lodging for people who were stranded by the shutdown in some train services because of the incident.

City officials said the true spirit of Manchester was surfacing in the hours after the incident.

___

3:35 a.m.

The Department of Homeland Security says there is no evidence of credible threats against music venues in the U.S., as England reels from an explosion at an Ariana Grande concert late Monday.

The department says the U.S. public may experience increased security in and around public places and events.

DHS says it is closely monitoring the situation at Manchester Arena and working with U.K. officials to obtain additional information about the cause of the explosion.

The government is urging U.S. citizens in Manchester to heed directions from local authorities and be vigilant about their security.

The explosion killed at least 19 people and injured dozens. Police say they are treating as a terrorist attack.

___

3:20 a.m.

Frantic loved ones of young people missing after an explosion at an Ariana Grande concert have taken to Twitter and Instagram with their photos and pleas for help.

Many Manchester residents responded early Tuesday with offers of shelter and details on locations where displaced concert-goers had been taken in.

The 23-year-old Grande, true to her youthful fan base, is a social media phenomenon with 105 million followers on Instagram and 45.6 million followers on Twitter. Her fans, proud "Arianators," were among those who took to Twitter with prayers and tears.

Fellow stars offered condolences as well.

Taylor Swift tweeted, "My thoughts, prayers and tears for all those affected by the Manchester tragedy tonight. I'm sending all my love."

Ellie Goulding, Cher (fresh from a big night at the Billboard Awards) and Katy Perry were among others to tweet their support.

Ariana Grande says she's 'broken' over deadly explosion after Manchester concert

Ariana Grande took to social media Monday night to express her sorrow over a deadly explosion that killed at least 22 people – including children – and injured 59 after her concert at England's Manchester Arena.

>> Police: At least 19 dead after explosion near Ariana Grande concert in Manchester

"Broken," tweeted the pop star, who was not hurt in the incident. "From the bottom of my heart, I am so so sorry. I don't have words."

>> See the tweet here

Her manager, Scooter Braun, also issued a statement.

>> PHOTOS: Explosion, fatalities at Ariana Grande concert in England

"Tonight, our hearts are broken. Words cannot express our sorrow for the victims and families harmed in this senseless attack," he wrote.

>> Manchester explosion: Here’s what we know about the victims

"We mourn the lives of children and loved ones taken by this cowardly act. We are thankful for the selfless service tonight of Manchester's first responders who rushed towards danger to help save lives. We ask all of you to hold the victims, their families, and all those affected in your hearts and prayers."

>> See the post here

According to The Associated Press, the blast, which occurred about 10:30 p.m. after Grande's show, is believed to be a terrorist attack carried out by a male suicide bomber, police said early Tuesday. 

>> Read more trending news

Read more here.

Apparent suicide bomber at Ariana Grande concert kills 22

An apparent suicide bomber attacked an Ariana Grande concert as it ended Monday night, killing 22 people among a panicked crowd of young concertgoers, some still wearing the star's trademark kitten ears and holding pink balloons as they fled.

Teenage screams filled the arena just after the explosion, which also killed the attacker and injured dozens.

The attack sparked a nightlong search for loved ones — parents for the children they had accompanied or agreed to pick up, and friends for each other after groups were scattered by the blast. Twitter and Facebook were filled with appeals for the missing.

There was no immediate claim of responsbility, but Chief Constable Ian Hopkins said police are treating the blast as an act of terrorism "until we know otherwise."

A police helicopter hummed over the city as somber commuters hurried to work.

Public transport shut down, and taxis offered to give stranded people free rides home, while residents opened their homes to provide lodging.

The concert was attended by thousands of young music fans in northern England. Grande, who was not injured, tweeted hours later: "broken. from the bottom of my heart, i am so so sorry. i don't have words."

Forensic investigations are trying to determine if the attacker had accomplices, Hopkins said. He provided no information about the person who set off the bomb.

He said some of the dead were children but provided no further details.

Hayley Lunt was staying at a hotel nearby and had taken her 10-year-old daughter Abigail to her first concert at Manchester Arena on Monday evening.

She said the explosions rang out as soon as Grande left the stage. "It was almost like they waited for her to go."

"We just ran as fast as we could to get away from that area," Lunt said. "What should have been a superb evening is now just horrible."

Campaigning for Britain's June 8 election was suspended.

The explosion struck near the exit around 10:30 p.m. Monday as Grande was ending the concert, part of her Dangerous Woman Tour. Police cars, bomb-disposal units and 60 ambulances raced to the scene as the scale of the carnage became clear. More than 400 officers were deployed.

"A huge bomb-like bang went off that hugely panicked everyone and we were all trying to flee the arena," said 22-year-old concertgoer Majid Khan. "It was one bang and essentially everyone from the other side of the arena where the bang was heard from suddenly came running towards us as they were trying to exit."

Home Secretary Amber Rudd decried "a barbaric attack, deliberately targeting some of the most vulnerable in our society — young people and children out at a pop concert."

The local ambulance service said 59 people were taken to hospitals.

The city's regional government and its mayor, Andy Burnham, were among scores of Twitter users who circulated the MissinginManchester hashtag, used by people looking for family members and friends.

Among the names being circulated was Olivia Campbell. Her mother, Charlotte Campbell, said the 15-year-old attended the concert with her best friend from school. He is hospitalized but Olivia is missing, the mother told ITV television's Good Morning Britain breakfast show.

"I've called the hospitals. I've called all the places, the hotels where people said that children have been taken and I've called the police."

She said she last heard from her daughter just before the concert.

"If anyone sees Olivia, lend her your phone, she knows my number."

There was no immediate claim of responsibility. Supporters of the extremist Islamic State group, which holds territory in Iraq's Mosul and around its de facto capital in the Syrian city of Raqqa, celebrated the blast online.

U.S. President Donald Trump, in Bethlehem, said the attack preyed upon children and described those responsible as "evil losers."

"This wicked ideology must be obliterated. And I mean completely obliterated," he added.

If the explosion is confirmed as a terrorist attack it would be the deadliest in Britain since four suicide bombers killed 52 London commuters on three subway trains and a bus in July 2005.

Video from inside the arena showed people screaming as they made their way out amid a sea of pink balloons.

British Prime Minister Theresa May is due to chair a meeting of the government's COBRA emergency committee later Tuesday.

The Dangerous Woman tour is the third concert tour by 23-year-old Grande and supports her third studio album, "Dangerous Woman."

Grande's role as Cat Valentine on Nickelodeon's high school sitcom "Victorious" propelled her to teen idol status, starting in 2010.

After Manchester, Grande was to perform at venues in Europe, including Belgium, Poland, Germany, Switzerland and France, with concerts in Latin America and Asia to follow.

Pop concerts and nightclubs have been a terrorism target before. Most of the 89 dead in the November 2015 attacks in Paris were at the Bataclan concert hall, which gunman struck during a performance by Eagles of Death Metal.

In Turkey, 39 people died when a gunman attacked New Year's revelers at the Reina nightclub in Istanbul.

Manchester, 160 miles (260 kilometers) northwest of London, was hit by a huge Irish Republican Army bomb in 1996 that leveled a swath of the city center. More than 200 people were injured, though no one was killed.

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Katz reported from London. AP writer Leanne Italie in New York; AP Music Writer Mesfin Fekadu in Jersey City, New Jersey, and Lori Hinnant and John Leiceister in Paris contributed.

Rebel Wilson tells court Australian articles hurt her career

A tearful Rebel Wilson testified on Tuesday that a series of magazine articles published in Australia were a deliberate attack on her character and damaged her acting career.

Wilson is suing Australian publisher Bauer Media for defamation over several articles published in 2015 that the Australian-born actress said led to her film contracts being terminated. The articles said Wilson had lied about her name, age and upbringing in Australia.

Wilson wiped away tears as she testified in the Supreme Court of Victoria, rejecting the publisher's argument that the stories were light-hearted and had no serious impact on her career.

"These articles were a deliberate malicious take-down of me," the actress testified.

Wilson, known for her work in comedies such as "Pitch Perfect" and "Bridesmaids," said she has only had two roles since the articles were published, one for the film "Absolutely Fabulous" and the other a stage role in London.

"It's not lucrative," she told the court. "The reason why I'm here today is to stand up for myself and to stand up for my family, who've been harassed."

Wilson is seeking unspecified damages from the publisher.

5 jurors picked for Cosby trial, 2 know a sex assault victim

The search for 12 jurors and six alternates for Bill Cosby's sexual assault trial is off to a brisk start even though a third of the initial jury pool had an opinion about Cosby's guilt or innocence and an equal number said they or someone close to them had been sexually assaulted.

Three men and two women, all white, were selected Monday. The lawyers studied each person's race, sex, age, occupation and interests to try to guess their inherent sympathies, experts said. Cosby, in an interview last week, said he thinks race "could be" a motivating factor in the accusations against him.

"You're looking for what people already believe," said University of Pittsburgh School of Law professor David Harris. "People don't take in new information and process it. They filter it into what they already know and think."

The actor-comedian once known as America's Dad for his portrayal of Dr. Cliff Huxtable on "The Cosby Show" is charged with drugging and molesting a Temple University women's basketball team manager at his home near Philadelphia in 2004. He has called the encounter consensual.

Dozens of other women have made similar accusations against Cosby, 79, but Judge Steven T. O'Neill is allowing only one of them to testify at the June 5 trial in suburban Philadelphia. The jury from Pittsburgh will be sequestered nearly 300 miles from home.

The jurors' names, ages and occupations were being kept private. Two of the men selected said they or someone close to them had been sexually assaulted, but they insisted they could judge the case fairly. Sometimes that is not so easy, one law professor said.

"It's one thing to set aside intellectually what you know, but it's another to set it aside emotionally," said Laurie Levenson, a Loyola Law School professor.

The case against Cosby has attracted worldwide publicity that the judge hopes to shield from jurors during the trial.

Cosby came to court on the arm of an aide, carrying a box of tissues, and frequently conferred with his three lawyers at the defense table. Lead defense lawyer Brian McMonagle said his client was eager to get the process started. Cosby has said he does not expect to testify.

The trial will take place in Norristown in Montgomery County, where Cosby had invited Andrea Constand to his home in 2004. Constand said she went seeking career advice. She said Cosby gave her wine and pills that put her in a stupor before molesting her on his couch.

Constand was 30 and dating a woman at the time, while Cosby was 66 and long married to wife Camille. Cosby in sworn testimony has said he put his hand down Constand's pants, but said she did not protest.

The Associated Press does not typically identify people who say they are the victims of sexual assault unless they come forward, as Constand has done.

The first group of 100 potential jurors summoned Monday included 16 people of color. Forty-one of them will return Tuesday for further questioning. The judge will bring in more people as needed.

Cosby was arrested Dec. 30, 2015, days before the 12-year statute of limitations expired. He has pleaded not guilty and remains free on $1 million bail.

He told a talk show host last week that he hopes to beat back the charges and resume his career.

"I want to get back to the laughter and the enjoyment of things that I've written and things that I perform on stage."

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Dale reported from Philadelphia.

Much-anticipated Ariana Grande concert ends in blood, horror

A night highly anticipated by Ariana Grande fans ended in blood and terror after police said a suicide bomber detonated explosives at the Manchester Arena.

At least 22 concertgoers were killed and about 60 others were wounded in the Monday night bombing, with six area hospitals treating the victims by Tuesday morning.

Shaun Hunter was with his daughters, Eva, 10, and Ruby, 12, who were wearing kitten ears like the star of the show, when the house lights went on. He called the rush of concertgoers after the explosion "a stampede."

"I saw one bloke carrying his daughter. She was bleeding," Hunter told The Times of London.

Andy Holey, who went to the arena to pick up his family, said the blast threw him some 30 feet through a set of doors.

"When I got up and looked around there was about 30 people scattered everywhere, some of them looked dead, they might have been unconscious but there was a lot of fatalities," he said.

Police gave no information about the attacker but said they were working to determine if there were any accomplices. Some of the dead were children, they said.

Grande, who had just left the stage, was unhurt, taking to Twitter to say: "From the bottom of my heart, I am so, so sorry. I don't have words."

Social media carried messages from families concerned about missing loved ones.

Ellie Ward, 17, made his way out of the arena after the blast, and found her 64-year-old grandfather, who had been waiting for him when the explosion happened.

"He said he only realized what had happened when he felt the side of his head and it was bleeding," the younger Ward told The Guardian newspaper.

"He's OK but he's cut his cheek," she said. "They said he had severed an artery. A lot of glass shattered on him."

"Everyone was screaming and running," Robert Tempkin, 22, told The Times. "There were coats and people's phones on the floor. People just dropped everything."

Elena Semino and her husband were waiting by the arena ticket office for her daughter when the explosion went off.

"My husband and I were standing against the wall, luckily, and all of a sudden there was this thing," she told The Guardian. "I can't even describe it. There was this heat on my neck and when I looked up there were bodies everywhere."

Despite wounds to her neck and a leg, Semino dashed into the auditorium in search of her daughter while her husband, who had only a minor injury, stayed behind to help an injured woman. She found her daughter Natalie, 17, and her friends safe.

The Latest: Corbyn says he, prime minister halting campaigns

The Latest on an explosion at an Ariana Grande concert in Manchester, England, that authorities say killed several people. (all times local):

6 a.m. Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn says he and Prime Minister Theresa May have agreed to suspend election campaigning until further notice.

Corbyn said Tuesday he is "horrified" by the events in Manchester and that his thoughts are with the families and friends of those who have died and been injured.

Campaign events ahead of the June 8 general election will now be put on hold as Britain comes to grips with the incident and its aftermath.

Corbyn says he had spoken with May after the explosion. __

5:45 a.m.

Australia's prime minister has told the Australian Parliament that the deadly explosion at Manchester Arena appeared to be a "brutal attack on young people everywhere."

Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull said on Wednesday the British were treating the blast that killed at least 19 people and injured more than 50 as a terrorist attack, although its cause was unknown.

Turnbull says: "This incident, this attack, is especially vile, especially criminal, especially horrific because it appears to have been deliberately directed at teenagers."

He added: "This is an attack on innocents. Surely there is no crime more reprehensible than the murder of children. This is a direct and brutal attack on young people everywhere, on freedom everywhere."

He says Australian diplomats were working to discover if any victim was Australian.

In Tokyo, a spokesman for the Japanese government condemned the attack.

Yoshihide Suga, the government's chief cabinet secretary, says: "If this is a terrorist attack, such abhorrent acts of terrorism cannot be justified for any reason, and Japan firmly condemns such an act of terrorism. I would like to express my heartfelt condolences to the victims and families of the deceased and my prayers to a swift recovery for the wounded. Japan stands in solidarity with the people of the U.K."

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4:00 a.m.

Campaigning has been suspended in Britain's national election after a deadly explosion at Manchester Arena.

Prime Minister Theresa May canceled campaign events Tuesday after the blast, which killed at least 19 people and injured more than 50. She is due to chair a meeting of the government's emergency committee, COBRA, later.

Liberal Democrat leader Tim Farron cancelled a campaign tour to Gibraltar after the explosion, which police say they are treating as a terrorist attack.

Britons are due to go to the polls on June 8.

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3:45 a.m.

A number of Manchester taxi services say they are offering free rides to people trapped by the incident.

The taxi companies posted messages about the free rides on Twitter after an explosion at Manchester Arena after an Ariana Grande concert Monday night. The blast killed 19 people and injured dozens more.

The service could also be used by people trying to get to local hospitals to look for loved ones.

In addition some city residents opened their homes to provide overnight lodging for people who were stranded by the shutdown in some train services because of the incident.

City officials said the true spirit of Manchester was surfacing in the hours after the incident.

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3:35 a.m.

The Department of Homeland Security says there is no evidence of credible threats against music venues in the U.S., as England reels from an explosion at an Ariana Grande concert late Monday.

The department says the U.S. public may experience increased security in and around public places and events.

DHS says it is closely monitoring the situation at Manchester Arena and working with U.K. officials to obtain additional information about the cause of the explosion.

The government is urging U.S. citizens in Manchester to heed directions from local authorities and be vigilant about their security.

The explosion killed at least 19 people and injured dozens. Police say they are treating as a terrorist attack.

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3:20 a.m.

Frantic loved ones of young people missing after an explosion at an Ariana Grande concert have taken to Twitter and Instagram with their photos and pleas for help.

Many Manchester residents responded early Tuesday with offers of shelter and details on locations where displaced concert-goers had been taken in.

The 23-year-old Grande, true to her youthful fan base, is a social media phenomenon with 105 million followers on Instagram and 45.6 million followers on Twitter. Her fans, proud "Arianators," were among those who took to Twitter with prayers and tears.

Fellow stars offered condolences as well.

Taylor Swift tweeted, "My thoughts, prayers and tears for all those affected by the Manchester tragedy tonight. I'm sending all my love."

Ellie Goulding, Cher (fresh from a big night at the Billboard Awards) and Katy Perry were among others to tweet their support.

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3 a.m.

Greater Manchester Police say they are working with national police and intelligence agencies in what is being treated as a terrorist incident.

Police said Tuesday morning they are still gathering information about the incident and are setting up a telephone hot line to help people locate loved ones. Police said there are 19 confirmed deaths.

Authorities are also asking the public to stay away from the area around Manchester Arena where an explosion disrupted a crowded pop concert by American artist Ariana Grande.

The British government is planning an emergency Cabinet meeting for later Monday morning.

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2:45 a.m.

British Prime Minister Theresa May says the government is working to learn the full details of the blast that killed 19 people at an Ariana Grande concert Monday night.

May says the government is trying to establish "the full details of what is being treated by the police as an appalling terrorist attack."

She said her thoughts are with the victims and the families of those who have been affected.

The government is expected to call an emergency cabinet meeting to deal with the incident.

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1:20 a.m.

Greater Manchester Police say 19 people have been confirmed dead in an explosion at Manchester Arena that is being treated as a possible terrorist attack.

Police said roughly 50 people were injured. Police said the incident started at 10:35 Monday night at an Ariana Grande concert.

Emergency vehicles were on the scene helping the injured and bomb disposal units were later seen outside the venue.

There was mass panic after the explosion at the end of the concert, which was part of Grande's The Dangerous Woman Tour.

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1:05 a.m.

Bomb disposal units were seen at Manchester Arena after an explosion during an Ariana Grande concert.

They were called after reports of an explosion that police said caused fatalities.

There were few immediate details and trains into the area were suspended.

A representative of Grande's US record label says the singer is OK and they are investigating what happened.

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11:55 p.m.

Police says there are "a number of fatalities" after reports of an explosion at an Ariana Grande concert in northern England.

Police advised the public to avoid the area around the Manchester Arena Monday night.

There were no immediate details of what happened during the concert by the American singer.

Video from inside the arena showed concertgoers screaming as they made their way out amid a sea of pink balloons.

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